Publications
Technical Report
2022

Finalisation of the Critical Skills List

The primary aim of the CSL is to identify occupations that are in shortage and unlikely to be developed domestically in time to prevent the obstruction of economic growth potential in the short to medium term.

Labour Market Intelligence research programme

Abstract

In 2020, the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET), through the Labour Market Intelligence (LMI) research programme, supported the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) in the development and application of a methodology to identify occupations for the Critical Skills List (CSL). The CSL forms the basis for the issuance of critical skills visas (CSVs) to critically skilled foreign nationals.

Accordingly, stakeholder engagement and validation emerged as a key component of the approach to the development of both the preliminary and the final CSL. Although the bulk of this report is dedicated to addressing comments regarding requests for inclusion in or exclusion from the list, the comments spanned a broad spectrum of topics.

Given the complexities within the country’s labour market, the development and subsequent finalisation of the CSL is a monumental task. As the technical report of the draft CSL correctly points out: The primary aim of the CSL is to identify occupations that are in shortage and unlikely to be developed domestically in time to prevent the obstruction of economic growth potential in the short to medium term. The importance of accurately identifying these occupations cannot be understated. If the criteria for inclusion are too flexible, South African citizens are disadvantaged; too strict and the economy suffers. The aim of this analysis was, therefore, to provide a balanced analysis of the evidence provided in a transparent and defensible manner.

This publication covers

  • Addressing requests for exclusion and inclusion
  • Criteria used for the CSL
  • Application of criteria
  • Second preliminary list (post-public comments)
  • Penultimate list